Friday, October 13, 2017

THE PRIME OF MISS LOIS SMITH, by Susan King

Actress Lois Smith says she’s absolutely thrilled the Cinematheque’s Aero Theatre is honoring her 62-year-film career with a three-day retrospective, “A Lois Smith Primer,” which opens Oct. 20 and concludes Oct. 22.


“It’s absolutely lovely,” she said during recent phone interview from her home in New York. “The problem I’ve been having with my feelings is that I think ‘Wait a minute, wait a minute, I’m not a movie star.”’

Thursday, October 5, 2017

MERYL STREEP TO PRESENT AMY ADAMS WITH AMERICAN CINEMATHEQUE AWARD

JAKE GYLLENHAAL, TOM HANKS, CHRIS MESSINA, NATALIE PORTMAN AND KRISTEN STEWART TO TOAST AMY ADAMS, RECIPIENT OF THE 31st AMERICAN CINEMATHEQUE AWARD SPONSORED BY GRoW @ Annenberg AT GALA TRIBUTE ON NOVEMBER 10 AT THE BEVERLY HILTON

Jake Gyllenhaal, Tom Hanks, Chris Messina, Natalie Portman and Kristen Stewart will appear in person to toast five-time Academy Award nominated and two-time Golden Globe winning actress Amy Adams, the 31st American Cinematheque Award Sponsored by GRoW @ Annenberg recipient. The award will be presented to Amy Adams by Meryl Streep at the Cinematheque’s annual benefit gala on Friday, November 10, 2017 at The Beverly Hilton (9876 Wilshire Blvd.) in Beverly Hills, CA. The award presentation will be held in the International Ballroom and will include in-person tributes from some of Adams’ colleagues and friends. The Sid Grauman Award will be presented the same evening, to Richard Gelfond and Greg Foster on behalf of Imax.

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

STEVEN SPIELBERG & CHRISTOPHER NOLAN TO INTRODUCE CLASSIC RESTORED FILMS AT THE EGYPTIAN THEATRE HOLLYWOOD

THE HOLLYWOOD FOREIGN PRESS ASSOCIATION, THE FILM FOUNDATION, AND THE AMERICAN CINEMATHEQUE’S CELEBRATE THE 75TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE GOLDEN GLOBE AWARDS WITH A SERIES OF RESTORED CLASSIC FILMS

  
Steven Spielberg and Christopher Nolan will join the Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA), The Film Foundation, and the American Cinematheque in person for select programs in a series celebrating the 75th Anniversary of the Golden Globe Awards. The screening series which will take place Sept. 21-24, 2017 at the Egyptian Theatre in Hollywood will showcase 35mm prints of restored classic films, including Elia Kazan’s A Face In The Crowd, the Powell-Pressburger masterpiece The Red Shoes, Robert Altman’s Come Back To The Five And Dime, Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean, the first film version of Death Of A Salesman, and Indian director Satyajit Ray’s acclaimed Apu Trilogy. The film restorations have been made possible in part by grants awarded annually to The Film Foundation by the HFPA. To date, the HFPA, in partnership with The Film Foundation, has helped fund the restoration of over 90 classic feature films.


Tuesday, September 12, 2017

THE RETURN OF THE KING, by Wade Major

Wade Major takes a look at the Apu Trilogy on occasion of our September 24 screening as part of the 75th anniversary of the Golden Globes. The series includes restorations of classic films that were made possible in part by funds awarded annually by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, with The Film Foundation. For more information about the other films in the series, click here

If you’re any kind of movie buff, you know that India makes more feature motion pictures than any other country on earth – but the nation that so famously struggles to this day with its centuries-old caste system also suffers from a kind of film industry caste system. Broken down by language, it is a hierarchy that favors films made in the three most dominant Indian languages – Hindi, Tamil, and Telugu – by a wide margin, relegating other regions to progressively lesser stature.


While Bengali cinema today falls somewhere near the middle of the pack, in the 1950s it was all but non-existent until a 31-year-old graphic designer by the name of Satyajit Ray, inspired by the work of De Sica and Renoir (for whom he had helped scout locations for The River), decided to adapt Bibhutibhushan Bandopadhyay’s beloved 1929 novel Pather Panchali into a film. Filmed intermittently over the course of three years – shutting down whenever they ran out of money and restarting as often as producer Anil Chowdhury was able to scrape together funds – Pather Panchali finally emerged as one of the great film sensations of 1955. Showered with acclaim and awards, Ray’s debut film not only launched the Parallel Cinema movement at home as a counterweight to Hindi-language Bollywood, but finally earned Indian cinema the international respect that had previously eluded it.

An auteur was born, and cinema would never be the same.

Wednesday, September 6, 2017

JEANNE MOREAU REMEMBERED, by Susan King

There was no one like Jeanne Moreau, the grand dame of French cinema who died this past July 31 at the age of 89.


Petite, passionate, and overflowing with sensuality, Moreau became the muse of countless directors including New Wave pioneers Louis Malle (Elevator to the Gallows, The Lovers), Francois Truffaut (Jules and Jim, The Bride Wore Black) and Jacques Demy (Bay of Angels), as well as Michelangelo Antonioni (La Notte) and Orson Welles (Chimes at Midnight, The Immortal Story). In fact, Welles once described Moreau as “the greatest actress in the world.” And one who, shockingly, was never nominated for an Oscar nor a Golden Globe.

Thursday, August 17, 2017

A SEASON FOR OZU, by Scott Nye

Scott Nye takes a look at the work of Yasujiro Ozu as the American Cinematheque rolls out a short series of Japanese classics August 24-26, 2017 at the Aero Theatre.

Yasujiro Ozu liked to begin his films with outdoor establishing shots: disassociated from the narrative, but a comfortable way to introduce the feeling of his film. Tokyo Story and An Autumn Afternoon, two of his most acclaimed films, are no exception. Ozu and his stalwart cinematographer YĆ»haru Atsuta chose two very telling images to kick things off. The black-and-white, 1953 film Tokyo Story begins at the seaside town of Onomichi, some 50 miles away from the city of Hiroshima. Our first glimpse is of the Jodo-ji temple, built in the 14th century and seeming to have survived the ruinous bombings of World War II, a testament to endurance and tradition. An Autumn Afternoon, by contrast, is in booming color. It’s 1962, nearly a decade later, and the national mood in Japan is shifting. We begin not at a seaside temple, but at a modern office and factory, its modernist striped cylinders seemingly constructed and arranged for the purpose of this shot.